Rotten, here's some Rebar for you.

TheDeamon
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Rotten, here's some Rebar for you.

Postby TheDeamon » Tue Feb 21, 2017 5:10 pm

http://basalt-rebar.com/

Although I think you're going to need a bigger welder. :)
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Rotten
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Re: Rotten, here's some Rebar for you.

Postby Rotten » Thu Mar 02, 2017 4:44 pm

Nice!

Yeah my welder definitely won't cut that.
TheDeamon
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Posts: 420
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Re: Rotten, here's some Rebar for you.

Postby TheDeamon » Thu Mar 02, 2017 6:10 pm

Well, melt it anyhow.

Allegedly, it is easier to work with in terms of cutting it. It also is much lighter, and slightly more elastic.

What it doesn't do better than Rebar is bend into shapes. If you want to do that, you have the heat the stuff up to some very high temps.

Evidently it makes for some insanely durable concrete though. The stuff will chemically meld with most concrete mixes even before it sets in fully. Unlike it's steel counterpart that doesn't bond at all, the concrete has to "set" around it, and that's the only thing keeping it in place. It also has very closely comparable thermal characteristics to concrete, so you don't have the whole thermal expansion/contraction issue that concrete + rebar has. The other item is that the stuff doesn't rust like steel does, so exposure to water/open air isn't a major problem, and because rust isn't an issue, you don't have to worry about it "blowing out" as it rusts, essentially destroying the concrete from the inside out.

Really, this is stuff that probably should be getting used on most public roads and bridges going forward, and not doing so should be almost borderline criminal, as it makes for a lighter, stronger, more robust, and more durable structure. But it's a new technology, engineers have to know about it first, and of course "it needs to be proven in the field" as its only been available to the public for just over 20 years now, and construction companies have to get used to working with the stuff. (That and the issue of bending it isn't exactly a casual undertaking)

But yeah, interesting to read some of the engineering side on it, such as the "lighter" claim isn't just a direct comparison to the steel rebar itself. Current construction/engineering practice is evidently to add 1 inch of extra concrete to give a structure "an additional 10 years" before moisture makes it to the steel rebar. So a significant portion of many pours for concrete isn't necessarily because it is "structurally needed" in order to bear the load stress it would bill under. It's being added to give the structure a longer lifespan, which is potentially unnecessary with the Basalt-Rebar.

Crazy stuff you find when you do some minor investigation into corrosion resistant construction options in regards to building in a marine environment. Geoplastic Concrete looks to be interesting stuff as well, but also highly dangerous to work around without PPE(due to truly nasty chemical burns, even beyond what portland cement can cause) and actual use of it is much trickier than the typical Portland Cement mix. Portland Cement mixes are simply easier to use.

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